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Table 1 Adaptations of the CD model to countries’ iCCM programme features

From: Community dialogues for child health: results from a qualitative process evaluation in three countries

Country CD facilitators’ profiles CD toolkit contents iCCM programme features
Uganda CHW (called Village Health Team, VHT, members) and local chairmen level 1 CD guide book (English only) and 4 thematic visual flipcharts (produced in local languages):
1 on VHT services, 1 about malaria, 1 about diarrhoea, 1 about pneumonia prevention and management. Available at http://ccmcentral.com/documents/enjoy-life-uganda-flipchart/ and http://www.thehealthcompass.org/project-examples/enjoy-life-community-dialogue-booklet
CHWs are volunteers who do not receive any financial incentive.
They receive a 5-day training.
They provide iCCM services (malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea) including newborn care counselling.
As per national guidelines, they are not trained nor tasked with organising regular health promotion activities.
2 CHWs are trained for each village.
Mozambique CHWs (locally referred to as APE, Agentes Polivalentes Elementares, in Portuguese) and the local first level administrative leader of each CHW catchment area. CD guide book and set of 18 pictorial flash cards (Portuguese only). Available at
http://ccmcentral.com/documents/cartas-para-saude-programa-dos-apes-mozambique/
CHWs are semi-volunteers who receive a monthly stipend of about USD 35.
They receive a 4-month training.
They provide both curative and preventive care:
Curative services: management of malaria for all age groups, pneumonia and diarrhoea for children under five, first aid.
Preventive services:
Health promotion and counselling through home visits and group meetings.
They usually cover large catchment areas.
Zambia Members of community-based organisations (Neighbourhood Health Committees, Safe Motherhood Action groups), community leaders (traditional, religious, elders, traditional birth attendants) and CHWs CD guide book cards, interactive poster and flash cards (Bemba and English languages). Available at
http://www.thehealthcompass.org/project-examples/child-health-interactive-poster-zambia and http://ccmcentral.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Community-Dialogues-for-Healthy-Children-Zambia_MOH-Zambia-MC_2012.pdf
CHWs are volunteers who do not receive any financial incentive.
They receive a 5-day training.
They provide iCCM services (malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea).
As per national guidelines, they are not trained nor tasked with organising regular health promotion activities.
They usually cover large catchment areas.